FAQ: About Therapy

A. Is therapy for me? How do I know if I need therapy?
B. Are all types of therapy/counselling the same?
C. How many people get counselling/therapy?
D. How often do I need to have a session?
E. Is there a set amount of sessions I would need to attend?
F. What will I have to tell the therapist?
G. What questions should I ask the therapist?
H. Is online therapy effective?
I. What makes online therapy different to regular, face-to-face therapy?
J. Can I refer someone who might need therapy?

A. Is therapy for me? How do I know if I need therapy?

Therapy is suitable for and can be beneficial to all sorts of people, from a wide range of situations and backgrounds, and with a wide variety of needs. For a list of things that therapy is known to help with, have a look at this A-Z list.

No problem is too small for therapy. If you are feeling stressed out or overwhelmed, if you have a challenge you would like help with overcoming, or if you just want to have a chat with someone and get something off your chest, then therapy could be right for you.

B. Are all types of therapy/counselling the same?

Not all therapies are the same, but they do have similarities. All therapies should make you feel that you are supported and help you to make sense of your individual circumstances. By the end of any therapy you should feel that you are better equipped to cope with the future.

Each type of therapy is designed to help a different set of needs, and so therapies will differ from each other in certain ways. Psychodynamic therapy concentrates on talking about your past, whereas other therapies may choose to focus on the present or even the future. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) often involves ‘homework’ for you to do. Bereavement therapy would focus more on helping you deal with difficult emotions. We've covered some of the most popular types of therapies in this guide.

C. How many people get counselling/therapy?

There are currently no statistics available on how many people receive therapy in the UK. However, it is clear that a growing number of people are seeking therapies like therapy - over 1.25 million people used the NHS mental health services in 2010, the highest number since data collection began, and this number increases every year. Research also shows that 1 in 4 British adults will suffer with a mental health problem at some stage in their life, so it is very common to experience some sort of difficulty that therapy could help you with.

D. How often do I need to have a session?

Most people will choose to have a session once a week, however, the recommended frequency of sessions will depend on the therapy you choose to receive. Your therapist will recommend to you how often you should have a session.

E. Is there a set amount of sessions I would need to attend?

The number of sessions you have will depend on your individual situation, and the type of therapy that you are receiving. Your specialist will discuss this with you. Sometimes a few sessions are required, sometimes one is enough. You can end the course of therapy whenever you feel is necessary, but it is suggested that you discuss your wish to end it with your specialist so that you can bring things to a satisfactory close.

F. What will I have to tell the therapist?

It is your decision what information you choose to share with your therapist. However, in order to enable your sessions to be effective, it is helpful if you let them know what it is that has brought you to therapy.

G. What questions should I ask the therapist?

You may want to ask your therapist how many sessions you will have and how often you should have them. It may also be helpful to ask them about costs and what will happen if you miss a session.

H. Is online therapy effective?

Yes! Online therapy has been proven work just as well, and in some cases better, than traditional, face-to-face therapy. Wagner, Horn and Maercker (2013) found that online therapy is just as effective as offline therapy at beating depression, and it was more effective than offline therapy at reducing depressive symptoms in the 3 months after the initial study.

I. What makes online therapy different to regular, face-to-face therapy?

There are many benefits to choosing online therapy over traditional face-to-face therapy. With traditional therapy from other organisations like the NHS, a therapist is allocated to you or you are assigned to a long waiting list, when you use PlusGuidance.com you have the freedom to choose from a wide range of specialists, with no travel expenses, and no time spent making your way to appointments.

You can choose to remain anonymous, and you can have your session in the comfort of your own home. You can have a therapy session at whatever time suits you with no regular, weekly, set time for an appointment – perfect for those with a busy work schedule.

J. Can I refer someone who might need therapy?

The most effective way for someone to get therapy is if they come to the decision of their own accord. While it is distressing to know someone who might be in need of therapy but hasn’t come to the decision themselves, the action needs to come from them.

What we can suggest, however, is to look up some of the therapists we work with and if their experience meets the need of the person you are worried about, take their details and encourage the person who may need the help to contact us in their own time and interest.

What is your current challenge?